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11/09/2019
There are several paths of the Camino de Santiago but below we will answer to one of your most requested questions, which are the main itineraries of the Camino de Santiago and the most walked ones detailing the stages for each itinerary. This article will allow you to get an idea of the days required to complete each of these trips and furthermore you will also know the length of each stage in order to adapt them. It is not necessary to be an expert walker to embark on the greatest adventure of the Camino de Santiago, it is only advisable to do a good planning and training in order to achieve it comfortably. At Galician Roots we are experts of the Camino de Santiago this is why we give you the opportunity to customise the stages and shorten them if needed, this will not diminish the merit to your adventure, you will only need to add days to fulfil the route but you will complete the same number of kilometres.
 
At Galician Roots we also offer several accommodation options for your Way of Saint James, depending on the selected path there are different types of accommodations that can fit with your needs and budget. Logically the most demanded and walked routes have a vast array of infrastructures and services however this does not mean that the other paths lack everything necessary to enjoy the Camino de Santiago. Every path will gift you with beautiful landscaped and memories so we will always tell you that whatever itinerary you choose the best thing is to come back and discover the other trails. As we mentioned above this article is a general overview of the main routes of the Camino de Santiago but in a future article we will also talk about the secondary paths of the Camino de Santiago.
 
THE FRENCH WAY
The French Way is the most popular and walked route of the Camino de Santiago. It has a length of 795 kilometres and goes along the northern part of the Iberia Peninsula from Saint Jean Pied de Port (France) to Santiago. This grants it several pluses since it is the one better marked currently and that offers the widest range of accommodations and services. During summer months it is also the Camino where you will meet the largest number of pilgrims, especially on the most famous stretch of the French Way: the last 100 kilometres of the French Way from Sarria to Santiago.
 
As we mentioned previously one of the most common starting points of the French Way of Santiago is Sarria, a small town located in the province of Lugo in Galicia from where there are approximately 114 kilometres of distance towards Santiago de Compostela. This journey can be done easily in 5 stages therefore it is one of the preferred options among pilgrims since it can be completed in only 7 days and it allow you to apply for the Compostela certificate where a minimum distance of 100 kilometres on foot is required. If you wish to complete your itinerary by bike then you must consider that the minimum distance required is 200 kilometres in order to apply for the Compostela certificate so you will need to start your journey in a previous point, such as Ponferrada for example.
 
If you wish to fulfil the full French Way from Saint Jean Pied de Port then you will need to do 33 stages of an average of 20-30 kilometres per day and 35 days are necessary to complete the trip.
If you prefer at Galician Roots we provide you the opportunity to customise these stages of the French Way of Santiago then you can for instance shorten the distances or also include some rest days in between of some stages.
 
Following disclosed are the official stages of the French Way of Santiago with the corresponding number of kilometres and miles
Stage 1: Saint Jean Pied de Port – Roncesvalles 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 2: Roncesvalles – Zubiri 21 kms / 13 mi
Stage 3: Zubiri – Pamplona 20 kms / 12,5 mi
Stage 4: Pamplona – Puente la Reina 23 kms / 14,5 mi
Stage 5: Puente la Reina – Estella 21 kms / 13 mi
Stage 6: Estella – Torres del Río 29 kms / 18 mi
Stage 7: Torres del Río – Logroño 20 kms / 12,5 mi
Stage 8: Logroño – Nájera 29 kms / 18 mi
Stage 9: Nájera – Santo Domingo de la Calzada 21 kms / 13 mi
Stage 10: Santo Domingo de la Calzada – Belorado 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 11: Belorado – Agés 27 kms / 16,5 mi
Stage 12: Agés – Burgos 23 kms / 14,5 mi
Stage 13: Burgos – Hontanas 31 kms / 19,3 mi
Stage 14: Hontanas – Boadilla del Camino 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 15: Boadilla del Camino – Carrión de los Condes 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 16: Carrión de los Condes – Terradillos de los Templarios 26 kms / 16 mi
Stage 17: Terradillos de los Templarios – El Burgo Ranero 30 kms / 18,5 mi
Stage 18: El Burgo Ranero – León 37 kms / 23 mi
Stage 19: León – San Martín del Camino 26 kms / 16 mi
Stage 20: San Martín del Camino – Astorga 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 21: Astorga – Foncebadón 26 kms / 16 mi
Stage 22: Foncebadón – Ponferrada 27 kms / 16,5 mi
Stage 23: Ponferrada – Villafranca del Bierzo 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 24: Villafranca del Bierzo – O Cebreiro 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 25: O Cebreiro – Triacastela 21 kms / 13 mi
Stage 26: Triacastela – Sarria 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 27: Sarria – Portomarín 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 28: Portomarín – Palas de Rei 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 29: Palas de Rei – Arzúa 29 kms / 18 mi
Stage 30: Arzúa – Pedrouzo 19 kms / 12 mi
Stage 31: Pedrouzo – Santiago 20 kms / 12,5 mi
 
At Galician Roots we offer you the possibility to complete this stretch dividing the longest stages, at the following link you will find all the information about this tour:
https://www.galicianroots.com/en/viaje/camino-de-santiago-a-medida-desde-saint-jean.htm
 
THE CENTRAL PORTUGUESE WAY AND THE COASTAL PORTUGUESE WAY
The Portuguese Way is the second travelled route after the French Way, there two variations at the moment: the Central Portuguese Way and the Coastal Portuguese Way.
The Central Portuguese Way goes along the inland of Portugal and Galicia, its itinerary passes by the XIX road partly, which was one of the major Roman paths that connected Braga and Astorga. 600 kilometres separate approximately Lisboa from Santiago, from Oporto the distance is around 240 kilometres and from Tui in Galcia there are 119 kilometres towards Santiago.
 
This last stretch from Tui is one of the most requested routes since it allows you to apply for the Compostela certificate and it can be done in only 5 stages of an average of 20-25 kilometres per day so you will only need 7 days and 6 nights to complete it.
 
Below is a list of all the stages of the Central Portuguese Way with the related kilometres
Stage 1: Lisboa – Alhandra 33 kms / 20,5 mi
Stage 2: Alhandra – Azambuja 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 3: Azambuja – Santarém 32 kms / 20 mi
Stage 4: Santarém – Golegã 30,5 kms / 19 mi
Stage 5: Golegã – Tomar 22 kms / 13,5 mi
Stage 6: Tomar – Alvaiazere 32 kms / 20 mi
Stage 7: Alvaiazere – Rabaçal 33 kms / 20,5 mi
Stage 8: Rabaçal – Coimbra 32 kms / 20 mi
Stage 9: Coimbra – Mealhada 23 kms / 14,5 mi
Stage 10: Mealhada – Águeda 31 kms / 19,3 mi
Stage 11: Águeda – Albergaria a Velha 19,5 kms / 12 mi
Stage 12: Albergaria a Velha – Oliveira de Azeméis 23 kms / 14,5 mi
Stage 13: Oliveira de Azeméis – Grijó 33,5 kms / 21 mi
Stage 14: Grijó – Oporto 23,5 kms / 14,6 mi
Stage 15: Oporto – Vilarinho 37 kms / 23 mi
Stage 16: Vilarinho – Barcelos 16,4 kms / 10 mi
Stage 17: Barcelos – Ponte de Lima 33,6 kms / 21 mi
Stage 18: Ponte de Lima – Rubiães 17 kms / 10,5 mi
Stage 19: Rubiães – Tui 19 kms / 12 mi
Stage 20: Tui – O Porriño 18 kms / 11 mi
Stage 21: O Porriño – Redondela 15 kms / 9,5 mi
Stage 22: Redondela – Pontevedra 18 kms / 11 mi
Stage 23: Pontevedra – Caldas de Reis 23 kms / 14,5 mi
Stage 24: Caldas de Reis – Padrón 18 kms / 11 mi
Stage 25: Padrón – Santiago 25 kms / 15,5 mi
 
The Coastal Portuguese Way starts in Oporto and joins the Central Portuguese Way in Redondela entering in Galicia through A Guarda, listed below are all the stages
Stage 1: Oporto – Labruge 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 2: Labruge – Póvoa de Varzim 16 kms / 10 mi
Stage 3: Póvoa de Varzim – Marinhas 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 4: Marinhas – Viana do Castelo 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 5: Viana do Castelo – Caminha 29 kms / 18 mi
Stage 6: Caminha – Mougás 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 7: Mougás – Ramallosa 16 kms / 10 mi
Stage 8: Ramallosa – Vigo 20 kms / 12,5 mi
Stage 9: Vigo – Redondela 17 kms / 10,5 mi
 
You can find all our tours of the Portuguese Way:
https://www.galicianroots.com/en/viajes/el-camino-de-santiago/el-camino-portugues.htm
 
THE NORTHERN WAY
The Northern Way is the third most travelled path of the Camino de Santiago and one of the oldest ones. It goes along the coast of Asturias and enters Galicia through Ribadeo. From Irún to Santiago te approximate distance is 825 kilometres and from Ribadeo there are about 195 kilometres to Santiago. This last section can be done in 9 stages between 20 and 30 kilometres each that can be fulfilled in only 11 days.
 
Below you can find the list with all the stages of the Northern Way from Irún to Santiago
Stage 1: Irún – San Sebastián 27,6 kms / 17 mi
Stage 2: San Sebastián – Zarautz 20,5 kms / 13 mi
Stage 3: Zarautz – Deba 22 kms / 13,5 mi
Stage 4: Deba – Markina 24,3 kms / 15 mi
Stage 5: Markina – Gernika 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 6: Gernika – Lezama 22 kms / 13,5 mi
Stage 7: Lezama – Bilbao 11 kms / 7 mi
Stage 8: Bilbao – Portugalete 19,7 kms / 12 mi
Stage 9: Portugalete – Pobeña 12,3 kms / 7,7 mi
Stage 10: Pobeña – Castro Urdiales 23,5 kms / 14,6 mi
Stage 11: Castro Urdiales – Laredo 30,6 kms / 19 mi
Stage 12: Laredo – Güemes 29,5 kms / 18,3 mi
Stage 13: Güemes – Santander 20,5 kms / 12,7 mi
Stage 14: Santander – Santillana del Mar 37 kms / 23 mi
Stage 15: Santillana del Mar – Comillas 22 kms / 13,5 mi
Stage 16: Comillas – Colombres 25,6 kms / 16 mi
Stage 17: Colombres – Llanes 20 kms / 12,5 mi
Stage 18: Llanes – Ribadesella 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 19: Ribadesella – Sebrayo 31,5 kms / 19,5 mi
Stage 20: Sebrayo – Gijón 34 kms / 21 mi
Stage 21: Gijón – Avilés 22,7 kms / 14 mi
Stage 22: Avilés – Soto de Luiña 38 kms / 23,5 mi
Stage 23: Soto de Luiña – Cadavedo 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 24: Cadavedo – Luarca 17 kms / 10,5 mi
Stage 25: Luarca – La Caridad 29 kms / 18 mi
Stage 26: La Caridad – Ribadeo 22 kms / 13,5 mi
Stage 27: Ribadeo – Lourenzá 29 kms / 18 mi
Stage 28: Lourenzá – Abadín 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 29: Abadín – Vilalba 21 kms / 13 mi
Stage 30: Vilalba – Baamonde 21 kms / 13 mi
Stage 31: Baamonde – Sobrado dos Monxes 41 kms / 25,5 mi
Stage 32: Sobrado dos Monxes – Arzúa 21,5 kms / 13,5 mi
Stage 33: Arzúa – Pedrouzo 19 kms / 12 mi
Stage 34: Pedrouzo – Santiago 20 kms / 12,5 mi
 
You can find our tours of the Northern Way at the following link:
https://www.galicianroots.com/en/viajes/el-camino-de-santiago/el-camino-del-norte.htm
 
THE PRIMITIVE WAY
As its name implies the Primitive Way is the oldest path and it was declared World Heritage in the year 2015. This route that connects Oviedo to Santiago de Compostela was used by the distinguished king Alfonso II the Chaste to confirm the discovery of the grave of Apostle Santiago. The Primitive Way from Oviedo has a length of 322 kilometres approximately and joins the French Way in Melide, if you wish to start from Galicia the stretch beginning in A Fonsagrada to Santiago has an average distance of 160 kilometres and can be completed in 9 days and 7 stages. This itinerary of the Way of Saint James has some rough stages with astonishing landscapes passing through emblematic cities such as Oviedo and Lugo.
 
Following is a list of the stages of the Primitive Way
Stage 1: Oviedo – San Juan de Villapañada 30 kms / 18,5 mi
Stage 2: San Juan de Villapañada – Salas 20 kms / 12,5 mi
Stage 3: Salas – Tineo 20 kms / 12,5 mi
Stage 4: Tineo – Pola de Allande 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 5: Pola de Allande – La Mesa 22 kms / 13,5 mi
Stage 6: La Mesa – Grandas de Salime 17 kms / 10,5 mi
Stage 7: Grandas de Salime – A Fonsagrada 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 8: A Fonsagrada – Cádavo Baleira 26 kms / 16 mi
Stage 9: Cádavo Baleira – Lugo 30 kms /18,5 mi
Stage 10: Lugo – San Romao da Retorta 20 kms / 12,5 mi
Stage 11: San Romao da Retorta – Melide 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 12: Melide – Arzúa 14 kms / 8,7 mi
Stage 13: Arzúa – Pedrouzo 19 kms / 12 mi
Stage 14: Pedrouzo – Santiago 20 kms / 12,5 mi
 
At the following link you can find our tour of the Primitive Way:
https://www.galicianroots.com/en/viajes/el-camino-de-santiago/el-camino-primitivo.htm
 
THE ENGLISH WAY
The English Way has two itineraries in Galicia, one starting from Ferrol with an approximate distance of 120 kilometres and from Coruña there are 75 kilometres, and both routes merge in Bruma. This path of the Camino de Santiago has its origin in those pilgrims coming from England, Scotland, Ireland and those who also came from Nordic countries who travelled by boat towards the coast of Galicia and arrived at the harbours of Ferrol and Coruña to start their pilgrimage. The itinerary from Ferrol to Santiago can be done in 7 days and 5 stages and from Coruña 5 days and 3 stages are necessary.
 
Listed below are all the stages of the English Way from Ferrol
Stage 1: Ferrol – Neda 15 kms / 9,5 mi
Stage 2: Neda – Pontedeume 16 kms / 10 mi
Stage 3: Pontedeume – Betanzos 21 kms / 13 mi
Stage 4: Betanzos – Hospital de Bruma 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 5: Hospital de Bruma – Sigüeiro 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 6: Sigüeiro – Santiago de Compostela 16,5 kms / 10,3 mi
 
And here are the stages of the English Way from Coruña
Etapa 1: A Coruña – Hospital de Bruma 33 kms / 20,5 mi
Etapa 2: Hospital de Bruma – Sigüeiro 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Etapa 3: Sigüeiro – Santiago de Compostela 16,5 kms / 10,3 mi
 
Here you can find our tours of the English Way:
https://www.galicianroots.com/en/viajes/el-camino-de-santiago/el-camino-ingles.htm
 
VÍA DE LA PLATA
Part of this route goes along the Roman path that connected Mérida and Astorga, with the progress of the Christian conquest this Jacobean itinerary extended to Sevilla. This path of the Camino de Santiago merges with the French Way I Astorga. From Sevilla to Santiago there are approximately 965 kilometres, this distance can be covered in 33 stages.
 
Find all the stages of the Vía de la Plata listed below
Stage 1: Sevilla – Guillena 23 kms / 14,5 mi
Stage 2: Guillena . Castilblanco de los Arroyos 17,5 kms / 11 mi
Stage 3: Castilblanco de los Arroyos – Almadén de la Plata 29 kms / 18 mi
Stage 4: Almadén de la Plata – Monesterio 34,5 kms / 21,5 mi
Stage 5: Monesterio – Fuente de Cantos 21,5 kms / 13,5 mi
Stage 6: Fuente de Cantos – Zafra 24,5 kms / 15 mi
Stage 7: Zafra – Almendralejo 36,7 kms / 23 mi
Stage 8: Almendralejo – Mérida 29,6 kms / 18,5 mi
Stage 9: Mérida – Alcuéscar 36 kms / 22,5 mi
Stage 10: Alcuéscar – Valdesalor 25,7 kms / 16 mi
Stage 11: Valdesalor – Casar de Cáceres 23 kms / 14,5 mi
Stage 12: Casar de Cáceres – Cañaveral 33,2 kms / 20,5 mi
Stage 13: Cañaveral – Galisteo 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 14: Galisteo – Cáparra 29,5 kms / 18,5 mi
Stage 15: Cáparra – Baños de Montemayor 28,5 kms / 17,7 mi
Stage 16: Baños de Montemayor – Fuenterroble de Salvatierra 33 kms / 20,5 mi
Stage 17: Fuenterroble de Salvatierra – San Pedro de Rozados 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 18: San Pedro de Rozados – Salamanca 23,5 kms / 14,6 mi
Stage 19: Salamanca – El Cubo de la Tierra del Vino 35 kms / 22 mi
Stage 20: El Cubro de la Tierra del Vino – Zamora 31,5 kms / 19,5 mi
Stage 21: Zamora – Montamarta 18,5 kms / 11,5 mi
Stage 22: Montamarta – Granja de Moreruela 22,7 kms / 14 mi
Stage 23: Granja de Moreruela – Benavente 25,5 kms / 16 mi
Stage 24: Benavente – Alija del Infantado 22 kms / 13,5 mi
Stage a 25: Alija del Infantado – La Bañeza 20,5 kms / 13 mi
Stage 26: La Bañeza – Astorga 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 27: Astorga – Foncebadón 26 kms / 16 mi
Stage 28: Foncebadón – Ponferrada 27 kms / 16,5 mi
Stage 29: Ponferrada – Villafranca del Bierzo 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 30: Villafranca del Bierzo – O Cebreiro 28 kms / 17,5 mi
Stage 31: O Cebreiro – Triacastela 21 kms / 13 mi
Stage 32: Triacastela – Sarria 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 33: Sarria – Portomarín 24 kms / 15 mi
Stage 34: Portomarín – Palas de Rei 25 kms / 15,5 mi
Stage 35: Palas de Rei – Arzúa 29 kms / 18 mi
Stage 36: Arzúa – Pedrouzo 19 kms / 12 mi
Stage 37: Pedrouzo – Santiago 20 kms / 12,5 mi
 
THE WAY TO FISTERRA AND MUXÍA
 
Unlike the other routes of the Camino de Santiago this itinerary starts from Santiago de Compostela and reaches Fisterra or Muxía. In the past Finisterre and the Costa da Morte (Coast of the Death) were considered as the end of the world, at present day many are those who come to gaze at the sunset from cape Fisterra when they end their pilgrimage. From Santiago to Fisterra there are approximately 85 kilometres and from Santiago to Muxía there are 115 kilometres approximately.
 
Below is the list of all the stages of the Fisterra and Muxía Way
Stage 1: Santiago de Compostela – Negreira 21 kms / 13 mi
Stage 2: Negreira – Olveiroa 32 kms / 20 mi
Stage 3: Olveiroa – Fisterra 35 kms / 22 mi
Stage 4: Fisterra – Muxía 30 kms / 18,5 mi
 
And here are our tours to Fisterra and Muxía:
https://www.galicianroots.com/en/viajes/el-camino-de-santiago/fisterra-muxia.htm
 
We hope this post was useful for you and we invite you to discover all the different routes of the Camino de Santiago that we offer:
https://www.galicianroots.com/en/el-camino-de-santiago.htm

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